• Free Resource with 100s of Verses on Identity in Christ

    Posted on July 31st, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Who I Am In Christ, Part Ten

     

    Knowing our identity in Christ is vital to glorifying God, defeating the lies of Satan, and ministering powerfully.

     

    Download for Free the Entire Series of Verses:

     

    If you’ve enjoyed and benefited from our posts on Who I Am In Christ, then here’s a special gift for you. Go here for a free download of every verse from the entire series: http://bit.ly/eqNQ

     

    Coming Soon to a Blog Near You!

     

    You’ll also enjoy and be empowered by our next series of posts on Who I Am To Christ.

     

    Here’s how these two sets of verses and spiritual principles are related:

     

    1. Who I Am IN Christ: This is our position in Christ. It relates to our being saints. These verses focus on our regeneration—our new nature in Christ.

     

    2. Who I Am TO Christ: This is our relationship to Christ. It relates to our being sons and daughters of the King. These verses focus on our reconciliation—our new family.

     

    The Original Source: Soul Physicians

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians: http://bit.ly/7vaE

  • Book Review: Seeing with New Eyes

    Posted on July 30th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Seeing with New Eyes:

    Counseling and the Human Condition through the Lens of Scripture

     

    *Title: Seeing with New Eyes

    *Author: David Powlison, Ph.D.

    *Publisher: P&R Publishing (2003)

    *Category: Church, Biblical Counseling, Ministry

     

    Reviewed By: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., LCPC, Author of Soul Physicians, Spiritual Friends, Beyond the Suffering, Sacred Friendships, and God’s Healing for Life’s Losses

     

    Recommended: Seeing with New Eyes offers a Christ-centered, comprehensive model for building a biblical theology of biblical counseling based upon a biblical psychology of human nature.

     

    Review: The Creator’s View of His Creation

     

    Author David Powlison is one of the foremost theologian-practitioners in the modern biblical counseling movement. Seeing with New Eyes compiles articles previously penned (over a period of two decades) by Powlison, all centered around the theme of a theology of biblical counseling.

     

    Thinking God’s Thoughts After Him

     

    Powlison defines counseling very practically as “intentionally helpful conversations.” His goal in Seeing with New Eyes is to equip readers to look at such spiritual conversations through God’s perspective—this encompasses the “new eyes” of the title. We see everything in life and ministry entirely differently when God’s eyes become our lens.

     

    Powlison uses the common and very helpful model of creation, fall, and redemption to unfold Scriptures’ view of people, problems, and solutions. It is through this three-fold conceptual grid that Seeing with New Eyes seeks to assist the church in the care and cure of souls.

     

    The premise is simply profound: Does God have a take on counseling? Powlison answers in the affirmative: God’s gaze has everything to say about the myriad issues counseling addresses. Seeing with New Eyes aspires to listen well, to look closely, and to think hard within the patterns of God’s gaze.

     

    Opening Blind Eyes

     

    Powlison organizes his thoughts in two parts: Scripture Opens Blind Eyes and Reinterpreting Life. In part one, readers enjoy a biblical theology of biblical counseling from three books of Scripture: Ephesians, Psalms, and Luke. In part two, readers benefit from a biblical psychology of biblical counseling: what is the nature of human nature and why do we do what we do?

     

    In several chapters on Ephesians, Powlison seeks to understand how Paul uses Scripture and thus how we should do so in practical theology. He then explores Paul’s view of God and the titanic difference our image of God must make in our lives and ministries. In a final chapter on Ephesians, Powlison uses Ephesians 5:21-6:4 as a model for understanding human relationships. Throughout this section Powlison artfully crafts a pastoral theology for real people with real life issues and a real God with real answers.

     

    Biblical counseling has sometimes been slow to emphasize suffering, instead focusing almost exclusively on sin. So it is encouraging to see Powlison spend two important chapters on the why and how of suffering, using the Psalms as his guide. These chapters provide a biblical sufferology useful both for the person going through suffering and for the person called along side to help the sufferer.

     

    His chapter on Luke is a sermon on Jesus’ sermon on worry. What Powlison does here is reflective of his entire purpose: he takes one section of Scripture and not only applies it, but models how we can apply it in biblical counseling.

     

    For readers wanting a full-blown, systematic, detailed theology of biblical counseling, Seeing with New Eyes may fall a little short. However, that was not Powlison’s purpose. However, for readers wanting an excellent introduction into how to view and use Scripture to begin to develop a biblical model of biblical counseling, Seeing with New Eyes is an excellent primer.

     

    What Is the Nature of Human Nature?: Why Do We Do What We Do?

     

    Having shared a foundational model of biblical counseling theology-building, Powlison now illustrates how to build a biblical psychology—a biblical view of “personality theory.” Put practically, he asks and answers the question, from the perspective of the Creator, “What makes us tick?”

     

    The strength of this section is found in Powlison’s insistence on building a view of human nature not coram anthropos (from the perspective of humanity), but coram Theos (from the perspective of God). We can understand people via people, or we can understand people via God. Powlison rightly chooses to understand the creature not through the creature but through the Creator.

     

    These nine chapters cover, in overview form, almost every issue a biblical counselor needs to ponder when developing a Christian approach to human nature. In each case, Powlison shows insight into the world’s perspective, shares his view of God’s perspective, and does both with a keen eye to practical application and ministry implications.

     

    Chapter 7 goes for the big picture of human motivation theory. It explores God’s “X-ray” of what He sees when He looks at why we do what we do. The 35 X-ray questions are worth the proverbial price of the book—practical, theological, psychological, motivational, convicting.

     

    Chapters 8 and 9 present a theology of desire and affections. Again, biblical counseling at times has been seen (and perhaps has been somewhat guilty of) to deemphasize desires, affections, and longings. These two chapters go a long way toward reemphasizing the biblical importance of and place of desire, rightly understood, in the Christian’s life. Powlison accurately demonstrates that desire and affection are good terms and core aspect of God’s design, but that because of the fall we must always battle the temptation to orient our desires away from God.

     

    No pie-in-the-sky theology, Powlison shows the practicality of a theology of desire/affection in chapter 10 when he addresses the question, What if your father didn’t love you? How does a Christian counselor deal with the legitimate but unmet desire (see James 4:1-4) of “father love”?

     

    Similarly, Powlison’s chapter What Do You Feel? explores another area that at times has seen limited press in modern biblical counseling. How do we understand emotions biblically and how do we mature as emotional beings? Powlison strikes a good balance between living for feelings and ignoring feelings.

     

    In his final chapter, Powlison attempts to address the complex issues surrounding bio-psychology: what is the role and relationship of the body to the mind? Powlison, in the space allowed, provides a nuanced approach. For instance, Powlison summarizes supportively the historic rule of thumb in biblical counseling, “See a doctor for your body. See your pastor, other pastoral counselors, and wise friends for your heart, soul, mind, might, manner of life, and the way to handle sufferings.” But perhaps because the mind/body issue is so complex in its God-designed interworking, this chapter at times felt a little less “deep” and a little too “definitive.” The possible interrelationship of mind/body, brain/soul at times seems a bit minimized. That said, Powlison does acknowledge the potential ambiguity and does encourage the biblical counselor to keep abreast of accurate medical research.

     

    Living Life Well

     

    Seeing with New Eyes is about living life well for God’s glory. It is a surprisingly cohesive book given that it pulls together over a dozen articles written over nearly two decades. It provides a consistent sampler of how to erect a biblical, God-honoring, God-following approach to people-helping. It  supplies a compass, a GPS, a directional marker, a map to guide, without being a straight-jacket to follow blindly. The gaze of Christ does in fact shape the spiritual conversations between real people in the real world.

     

     

     

  • You Are An Overcomer in Christ

    Posted on July 29th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Who I Am In Christ, Part Nine

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians:

     

    Note: Knowing our identity in Christ is vital to glorifying God, defeating the lies of Satan, and ministering powerfully. As you read the following summaries:

     

    *Meditate on the associated verses and on the truth they share about you.

     

    *Reject the lies of Satan about your identity.

     

    *Thank God for who you are in Christ.

     

    *Select one verse/truth per day and specifically apply it to your life and relationships.

     

    My Identity in Christ

     

    2 Peter 1:3—God’s Divine power has given me everything I need for life and godliness.

     

    2 Peter 1:4—Through God’s great and precious promises I participate in the Divine nature.

     

    2 Peter 1:4—Through God’s great and precious promises I have escaped the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.

     

    1 John 2:20—I have an anointing from the Holy One and I know the truth.

     

    1 John 4:4—I have overcome the world, the flesh, and the Devil because greater is He who is in me, than he who is in the world.

     

    1 John 4:4, 6—I am from God.

     

    1 John 4:7; 5:1—I am born of God.

     

    1 John 5:4-5—Born of God, I overcome the world by faith in Christ.

     

    Jude 24—I stand before God’s glorious presence without fault and with great joy.

     

    Revelation 1:5—I am freed from my sins by Christ’s blood.

     

    Revelation 1:6—God has made me, together with all the saints, a kingdom of priests.

     

    Revelation 19:7-8, 14—Along with all the saints, I am the pure Bride of Christ, clean, white, and righteous.

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians:

     

  • Blameless in Christ!

    Posted on July 28th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Who I Am In Christ, Part Eight

     

    Note: Knowing our identity in Christ is vital to glorifying God, defeating the lies of Satan, and ministering powerfully. As you read the following summaries:

     

    *Meditate on the associated verses and on the truth they share about you.

     

    *Reject the lies of Satan about your identity.

     

    *Thank God for who you are in Christ.

     

    *Select one verse/truth per day and specifically apply it to your life and relationships.

     

    My Identity in Christ

     

    1 Thessalonians 3:13—I am blameless and holy before God’s presence in Christ.

     

    1 Thessalonians 5:23—God is sanctifying me through and through.

     

    1 Thessalonians 5:23—God keeps my whole spirit, soul, and body blameless.

     

    2 Thessalonians 2:14—I am called to share in the glory of the Lord Jesus Christ.

     

    2 Timothy 1:7—God placed within me His Spirit of power, love, and wisdom.

     

    2 Timothy 2:3-4—I am a dedicated soldier in Christ.

     

    2 Timothy 2:5—I am a victorious athlete in Christ.

     

    2 Timothy 2:6—I am a disciplined, hard working farmer in Christ.

     

    Titus 3:5—I am saved, washed, re-birthed, and renewed in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 1:3—I am purified from sin in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 2:10—I am brought to glory in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 2:11—I am made holy in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 7:25—I am saved completely in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 8:10; 10:16—God’s law is in my mind, written on my heart.

     

    Hebrews 9:12—I have eternal redemption in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 9:14—My conscience is cleansed in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 9:15—I am set free from sin in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 9:26-27—My sins are done away with and taken away in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 10:2—I am cleansed once for all and guiltless in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 10:10—I have been made holy once for all by Christ’s sacrifice.

     

    Hebrews 10:14—I have been made perfect forever in Christ.

     

    Hebrews 10:22—I am cleansed and washed in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 1:3—I am born again, given new birth in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 1:18-19—I am redeemed from my old empty way of life by Christ’s precious blood.

     

    1 Peter 1:22—I am purified by faith in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 1:23—I have been born again of imperishable seed in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 2:5—I am a living stone, being built into a spiritual house in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 2:5—Along with all the saints, I am a holy priesthood in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 2:9—Along with all the saints, I am a chosen people in Christ.

     

    1 Peter 2:9—Along with all the saints, I am a member of a royal priesthood.

     

    1 Peter 2:9—Along with all the saints, I am a citizen of a holy nation.

     

    1 Peter 2:9-10—Along with all the saints, I am a people belonging to God.

     

    1 Peter 2:9—I am called out of darkness into Christ’s wonderful light.

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians: http://bit.ly/7vaE

  • Holy in Christ

    Posted on July 24th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Who I Am In Christ, Part Six

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians: http://tinyurl.com/d8grf6

     

    Note: Knowing our identity in Christ is vital to glorifying God, defeating the lies of Satan, and ministering powerfully. As you read the following summaries:

     

    *Meditate on the associated verses and on the truth they share about you.

     

    *Reject the lies of Satan about your identity.

     

    *Thank God for who you are in Christ.

     

    *Select one verse/truth per day and specifically apply it to your life and relationships.

     

    My Identity in Christ

     

    Ephesians 1:1—I am faithful in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 1:4—I am holy in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 1:4—I am blameless in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 1:17-19—I have God’s resurrection power actively working in me.

     

    Ephesians 2:5—I am alive with Christ.

     

    Ephesians 2:5, 8—I am saved by grace in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 2:6—I have been raised up with Christ.

     

    Ephesians 2:6—I am seated with Christ in the heavenly realms.

     

    Ephesians 2:10—I am Christ’s workmanship, His opus, His poem, His masterpiece. 

     

    Ephesians 2:10—I was prepared in advance in Christ Jesus to do good works.

     

    Ephesians 2:15—Together with all the saints, I am a new person in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 2:21—Along with all the saints, I am God’s holy temple.

     

    Ephesians 2:22—I am a dwelling in which God lives by His Spirit.

     

    Ephesians 3:16—I am strengthened with power through God’s Spirit.

     

    Ephesians 3:17—Christ dwells in my heart.

     

    Ephesians 3:17—I am rooted and established in love.

     

    Ephesians 3:18—I have power to grasp God’s great love for me in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 3:19—I am filled to the measure of all the fullness of God in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 3:20—Christ’s immeasurable resurrection power is at work within me.

     

    Ephesians 4:13—I am maturing to the full measure of the fullness of Christ.

     

    Ephesians 4:22—My old self is put off in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 4:23—I have been made new in the attitude of my mind in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 4:24—My new self is put on in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 4:24—I am created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness.

     

    Ephesians 5:8—I am now light in the Lord.

     

    Ephesians 5:9—The fruit of my life is goodness, righteousness, and truth.

     

    Ephesians 5:26—I am cleansed in Christ

     

    Ephesians 5:26—I am washed in Christ.

     

    Ephesians 5:27—Together with the Bride of Christ, I am presentable, radiant, without stain or wrinkle or any other blemish, but holy and blameless.

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians: http://tinyurl.com/d8grf6

     

    http://bit.ly/5Zvvp

  • Seeing Race Relations through Christ-Colored Glasses

    Posted on July 21st, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Seeing Race Relations through Christ-Colored Glasses

     

    The incident involving the arrest of African American Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., seems like an all-too-familiar case of “he said/she said” complicated by the still contentious issues of race in American society. And the responses seem equally predictable: people choosing sides left and right (see http://tinyurl.com/nejvyy for a summary article—and be sure to read the scores of one-sided comments from readers).

     

    Reviewing the Situation

     

    Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is African American. He also is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and the Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. (For his academic bio, go here:  http://tinyurl.com/ceah7r.)

     

    Professor Gates arrived home after a week in China to find his front door jammed shut. He and his African American driver attempted to force the door open. A White neighbor called police to report a possible break-in by two African American males wearing backpacks.

     

    Two Sides to Any Story

     

    This is where the details get dicey. If you want the extended version of the story (stories), go here: http://tinyurl.com/nejvyy).

     

    Of course, there are always two sides to any story. And we always view our side through our grid—our background, our perspective, our history, and, yes, our ethnicity.

     

    Professor Gates maintains that he cooperated with the police, showed his ID, and asked for the officer’s ID—likely because he was beginning to sense that, from his perspective, racial issues were at least a part of the issue. When the officer refused to show his ID, Professor Gates apparently began to verbalize his concerns about potential racism.

     

    Looking at Life through Professor Gates’ Eyes

     

    Before anyone judges Professor Gates as a “liberal, whining, race-baiting, African American” (as many have done on various web sites), perhaps it would be helpful to walk a mile in his shoes.

     

    I travel. It’s exhausting. A week-long business trip to China would be especially draining. After such a grueling trip, I’d want to place my key in my door, enter, plop down, and chill for the night. The last think I would want would be to have to break into my own house. And certainly the last thing I would want would be to have someone accuse me of being a criminal.

     

    Now, that’s as a “White guy” who has not experienced racism and prejudice. Professor Gates has lived it. He has researched it. He was witnessed it. So, yes, is it possible that he sees life at times with “race colored glasses”—seeing racism where it may not exist? Perhaps.

     

    It is also possible that he sees and senses the subtle and frustrating signs of racism where others miss those signs. Perhaps he sees in this very personal situation a small taste of what his entire life’s work has highlighted. Maybe it felt to him like one more maddening example of racial profiling.

     

    Police officers are trained to assess situations. They are trained to look for verbal and non-verbal clues. Did this older, distinguished looking gentleman really look the part of a thief? How many times have African Americans been stopped by White officers in majority White neighborhoods for no other obvious reason than the color of their skin?

     

    Could the White officers have defused the situation? Explained better their procedure? Empathized more with a weary traveler? Walked away when they felt verbally attacked, rather than handcuffing and arresting Professor Gates?

     

    Looking at Life through the Police Officer’s Eyes

     

    Before anyone judges the arresting officer as a “racist, rude, prejudicial, arrogant, aggressive cop,” (as many have done on various web sites), perhaps it would be helpful to walk a mile in his police shoes. The police officer has his own side of the story—and he has his own lenses through which he observes life.

     

    Surely it all began innocently. He was responding to a 911 call of a possible breaking and entering. Following procedures, he reached the home to see a man trying to force his way into the house. Suspicions arouse, tensions mount.

     

    He properly asks for identification. Now the situation begins to escalate. Perhaps Professor Gates is raising his voice. He’s making accusations of racism. At the end of a long shift, perhaps this police officer is not only weary, but now he is shocked and feels defensive. No, with many officers present, his physical safety was not endangered. But maybe this officer is thinking, “I’m just trying to do my job. I’m here to protect your home. Let’s not make this something it isn’t. I am not a racist! Let’s just drop this and move on, okay?”

     

    As sad as the incident is, what is even sadder is the predictable public response. People choosing sides. No one trying to look at both sides. Isn’t that the very reason we still have racial tension in America today?

     

    Be honest. As you’re reading right now, you are “yes butting” me. If you tend toward Professor Gates’ view, then you have a myriad of thoughts about how, “this White guy Kellemen just doesn’t get it!”

     

    If you tend toward supporting the police officer, then you have a millions sentences going through your mind like, “Kellemen is a liberal White guy pandering to African Americans!”

     

    Looking at Life through Christ’s Eyes

     

    Well, then, forget my eyes. Let’s look at this through Christ’s eyes.

     

    Consider four basic principles of cultivating Christlike intercultural relational competency. I called them a Christ-centered TEAM approach.

     

    *T: Taking another person’s earthly perspective through empathy and culturally-informed listening.

    *E: Engaging in bridge-building spiritual conversations through focusing on God’s eternal perspective.

    *A: Abolishing barriers through forgiveness and reconciliation.

    *M: Making intercultural peace through spiritual renewal.

     

    The T in Team

     

    It’s easy for us to say that Gates or the officer should have taken each other’s perspective, that they should have empathized with each other’s background, or that they should have seen life from each other’s lenses.

     

    But what about us? Rather than quickly picking sides, could we step back and try to see things from both perspectives? Could Black brothers and sisters try for a minute to see this situation from the White officer’s perspective? Could White brothers and sisters try for a minute to see this situation from the Black professor’s perspective?

     

    This does not mean that we close a blind eye to racism. It does not mean that we accept every charge of racism as valid. It simply means that we start with empathy—T—taking another person’s perspective.

     

    The E in tEam

     

    Now, I hardly expect that in the heat of the night, the Professor and the Officer would have sat down for coffee to build bridges of understanding! But now that the heat has had time to subside, don’t you think they, and don’t you think we, could start a little bridge-building?

     

    I mean, just take a look at those comments on the link above! Perhaps 1% constitute a bridge-building comment. What’s up with that? Are we sill so racially divided in America that no one can say, “Let’s focus on God’s eternal perspective”?

     

    According to Revelation 7:9, we will spend eternity fellowshipping and worshipping in racial and ethnic diversity. Maybe we should start practicing now. Maybe we could have some candid, honest, frank bridge-building spiritual conversations that look at situations like this through Christ’s eyes.

     

    The A in teAm

     

    Building bridges is a start. Once built, we can reach out hands that work together to abolish barriers through forgiveness and reconciliation. My guess, and I’m sure I’ll make everyone mad with this, is that there is plenty of confession and forgiveness to go around in the Professor/Officer incident.

     

    And there’s plenty to go around for all of us as we react in knee-jerk ways like…well, jerks! Ripping Professor Gates and ripping the so-far unnamed Officer is a far cry from Jesus’ cry on the cross, “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

     

    Of course, true forgiveness includes, leads to, and offers reconciliation. God can create something beautiful out of the mess that is this Professor/Officer situation. He could help you and me, brothers and sisters of different hues, to reconcile with one another.

     

    The M in teaM

     

    Peace is more than the absence of hostility. Biblical peace, scriptural shalom, is the presence of unity in diversity.

     

    That’s not natural; that is supernatural. It requires spiritual renewal.

     

    I find it fascinating that when the Apostle Paul speaks of the peace of Christ ruling in our hearts and of singing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs together, that the context is intercultural harmony! Ninety-nine percent of the time we miss that context. We think Colossians 3:1-17 is about whether we worship with traditional hymns or with contemporary praise songs or with Gospel spirituals.

     

    But Paul precedes his comments on worship with the comment that in Christ “there is no Greek or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarians, Scythians, slave, or free, but Christ is all, and is in all” (Colossians 3:11).

     

    And Paul even precedes those comments by insisting that all who have been raised with Christ must set their hearts and minds where Christ is seated at the right hand of God (Colossians 3:1).

     

    That means that we must set our eyes, our lenses, our perspectives on God’s heavenly, eternal perspective. Now we’ve come full circle because we already know that heaven is an eternal multicultural worship and fellowship service!

     

    So let’s get it right now. Peace comes from spiritual renewal. And spiritual renewal comes from Christ. And as new creations in Christ we wear Christ’s eyeglasses not our own.  

     

    Life

     

    Life is not, “He said/she said.”

     

    Life is “Thus saith the Lord!”

     

    And the Lord of all says live at peace with everyone for we are all one in Christ.

     

  • New Creations in Christ

    Posted on July 21st, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Who I Am In Christ, Part Five

     

    Note: Knowing our identity in Christ is vital to glorifying God, defeating the lies of Satan, and ministering powerfully. As you read the following summaries:

     

    *Meditate on the associated verses and on the truth they share about you.

     

    *Reject the lies of Satan about your identity.

     

    *Thank God for who you are in Christ.

     

    *Select one verse/truth per day and specifically apply it to your life and relationships.

     

    My Identity in Christ

     

    1 Corinthians 1:2—I am sanctified in Christ Jesus.

     

    1 Corinthians 1:2; Ephesians 5:26; Colossians 3:12—I am holy in Christ.

     

    1 Corinthians 1:8—I am blameless in Christ.

     

    1 Corinthians 1:30—I am wise in Christ.

     

    1 Corinthians 1:30—I am holiness to God in Christ.

     

    1 Corinthians 2:16—I have the mind of Christ.

     

    1 Corinthians 3:9—I am God’s fellow worker.

     

    1 Corinthians 3:9—I am God’s field.

     

    1 Corinthians 3:9—I am God’s building.

     

    1 Corinthians 3:16-17; 2 Corinthians 6:16—I am God’s sacred temple.

     

    1 Corinthians 6:11—I am washed in Christ.

     

    1 Corinthians 6:19—I am the temple of the Holy Spirit.

     

    1 Corinthians 6:20—I have been bought and redeemed with a price.

     

    2 Corinthians 2:14—Christ always leads me in a triumphal victory march.

     

    2 Corinthians 3:6—I am a competent minister of the new covenant in Christ.

     

    2 Corinthians 3:10—In Christ I have surpassing, lasting glory.

     

    2 Corinthians 3:18—I am a growing reflection of the Lord’s glory.

     

    2 Corinthians 3:18—I am increasingly being transformed into Christ’s likeness.

     

    2 Corinthians 4:16—I am being renewed inwardly day by day in Christ.

     

    2 Corinthians 5:17—I am a new creation in Christ.

     

    2 Corinthians 5:18—I am a minister of reconciliation.

     

    2 Corinthians 5:20—I am Christ’s ambassador.

     

    2 Corinthians 5:21—I have the righteousness of God in Christ.

     

    2 Corinthians 8:9—I am spiritually rich in Christ.

     

    2 Corinthians 11:2—I am Christ’s spiritually pure virgin.

     

    Galatians 1:4—I have been rescued from this present evil age.

     

    Galatians 2:20—I am crucified with Christ.

     

    Galatians 3:13-14—I am redeemed from the curse.

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians: http://tinyurl.com/d8grf6

     

  • The Best Web Sites for Christianity and the News

    Posted on July 20th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Kellemen’s Christian The Best Of Guide

    The Best of Web Sites for Christianity and the News

     

    Kellemen’s Christian The Best of Guide: Making your life easier by finding, summarizing, evaluating, and posting the best resources on a wide variety of topics from a Christian perspective.

     

    The Best of Web Sites for Christianity and the News

     

    *Everyday Christian: http://www.everydaychristian.com

     

    Everyday Christian doesn’t just tell you about “Christianity in the news.” It gives you a Christian perspective on whatever is in the news. Solid writing by a growing team of experienced journalists who are committed a Christian worldview.

     

    *Christianity Today: http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/ 

     

    This is the online site for the venerable Evangelical Christian magazine. Tons of links to topics of importance to Evangelical Christians.

     

    *Belief Net Christianity: http:www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Christianity/index.aspx

     

    Belief Net itself is not focused on the Christian faith alone. However, their Christianity link highlights news relevant to Christians. Their focus is very broadly Christian—be discerning.

     

    *Examiner: Evangelical: http://tinyurl.com/l3buz6

     

    The Examiner is like a growing number of sites with national and local news—something of a USA Today online. The Evangelical page highlights news of interest to Evangelical Christians from an Evangelical perspective.

     

    *Life News: http://www.lifenews.com

     

    Life News is a pro-life online site with news related to the sanctity of human life—political, religious, and philosophical.

     

    *Washington Post: God in Government: http://tinyurl.com/nrl9jm

     

    The God in Government section/blog of the Washington Post examines religion’s impact on politics. Co-written by Jacqueline L. Salmon and Michelle Boorstein, their slant is not necessarily Evangelical per se, but they do keep you abreast of religion and politics in the news.

     

    *About.com Christianity: http://christianity.about.com/      

     

    Like The Examiner, About is a leading online news source on scores of topics. Their Christianity topic provides a boatload of links to news relevant to believers.

     

    Important Stuff

     

    *Your Guide: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., LCPC, is the Founder and CEO of RPM Ministries (www.rpmministries.org) through which he writes, speaks, and consults to equip God’s people to change lives with Christ’s changeless truth. He blogs daily at http://rpmministries.blogspot.com.

     

    *My Necessary Disclaimer: Of course, I don’t endorse everything in every article, book, or link that you’ll find in Kellemen’s Christian The Best of Guide. I report, you decide.

     

    *Your Suggestions Are Welcomed: Feel free to post comments and/or send emails (rpm.ministries@gmail.com) about resources that you think deserve attention in various categories covered in Kellemen’s Christian The Best of Guide.

     

  • Who I Am in Christ, Part 4

    Posted on July 18th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Who I Am In Christ, Part Four

     

    Note: Knowing our identity in Christ is vital to glorifying God, defeating the lies of Satan, and ministering powerfully. As you read the following summaries:

     

    *Meditate on the associated verses and on the truth they share about you.

     

    *Reject the lies of Satan about your identity.

     

    *Thank God for who you are in Christ.

     

    *Select one verse/truth per day and specifically apply it to your life and relationships.

     

    My Identity in Christ

     

    Romans 6:8—I live with Christ.

     

    Romans 6:11—I am dead to sin.

     

    Romans 6:11—I am alive to God.

     

    Romans 6:13—I have been brought from spiritual death to spiritual life.

     

    Romans 6:14—Sin shall not be my master.

     

    Romans 6:14—I am not under law, but under grace.

     

    Romans 6:18, 22—I have been set free from sin.

     

    Romans 6:19—I am a slave to righteousness, righteousness masters my being.

     

    Romans 6:22—I am a slave to God.

     

    Romans 7:4—I have died to the law.

     

    Romans 7:6—I serve Christ in the new way of the Spirit.

     

    Romans 7:22—My inner being delights in God’s law—His holy standards.

     

    Romans 7:25—In my innermost mind, I am a slave to God’s law.

     

    Romans 8:1—I will never suffer condemnation because I am in Christ.

     

    Romans 8:2—I am set free from the law of sin and death in Christ.

     

    Romans 8:4—I have met the righteous requirements of the law in Christ.

     

    Romans 8:5—My mindset is on spiritual affections and passions.

     

    Romans 8:9—I am not controlled by the flesh, but I am controlled by the Spirit.

     

    Romans 8:29—I am predestined to be conformed to the image of the Son.

     

    Romans 8:37—I am more than a conqueror in Christ.

     

    Romans 9:23—I have been prepared in advance by God to be glorious.

     

    Romans 10:9, 10, 13—I am saved in Christ.

     

    Romans 15:14—I am full of goodness in Christ.

     

    Romans 15:14—I am complete in knowledge in Christ.

     

    Romans 15:14—I am competent to disciple others in Christ.

     

    Romans 15:16—I am sanctified by the Holy Spirit.

     

    Romans 15:16—I am acceptable to God in Christ.

     

    Note: Excerpted from Soul Physicians: http://tinyurl.com/d8grf6

     

  • Be Equipped to Change Lives

    Posted on July 17th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Be Equipped to Change Lives

     

    I’d like to invite you to join me (Bob Kellemen) at the AACC’s World Conference from Wednesday, September 16, 2009 through Saturday, September 19, 2009 in Nashville, TN.

     

    Our Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Formation Network (BCSFN) has many equipping events planned to empower you to change lives with Christ’s changeless truth.

     

    BCSFN Pre-Conference

     

    The BCSFN will hold its first “Conference-within-a Conference” during the AACC World Pre-Conference on Wednesday, September 18.

     

    In the morning session from 9:00 AM to Noon, I (Bob Kellemen) will present on Developing a Theology and Methodology of Biblical Counseling. Learn seven essential biblical counseling competencies necessary to build a truly scriptural approach to Christian counseling.

     

    In the afternoon session from 2:00 to 5:00 PM, Ron Hawkins will present on Using the Bible Accurately and Effectively in Biblical Counseling.

     

    To register for the Pre-Conference go here http://tinyurl.com/nw5z2p

    and then select the Pre-Conferences by Kellemen and Hawkins to join others interested in biblical counseling and spiritual formation equipping.

     

    BCSFN Track Presentations

     

    During the AACC World Conference, from Thursday, September 17 to Saturday, September 19, the BCSFN has its own track, where we will be hearing from the following speakers:

     

    *Ian F. Jones, “Biblical Counseling in the Historical Church,” Thursday, September 17, 8:45 to 10:00 AM, Session 103.

     

    *Gary Moon, “Discipleship vs. Apprenticeship: An Experiential Approach to Spiritual Growth,” Thursday, September 17, 2:15 to 3:30 PM, Session 203.

     

    *Robert W. Kellemen, “How to Practice Comprehensive Biblical Counseling: Implementing a Dozen Dreams,” Friday, September 18, 8:45-10:00 AM, Session 303. Learn how to care like Christ by providing Christ-centered, comprehensive, compassionate, and culturally-informed biblical counseling and spiritual formation.

     

    *Scott E. Wiggington, “For Crying Out Loud: Reclaiming the Lost Language of Lament in Christian Counseling,” Friday, September 18, 2:15 to 3:30 PM, Session 403.

     

    *Phil Monroe, “Engaging Biblical Texts in Trauma Therapy,” Friday, September 18, 4:15 to 5:30 PM, Session 503.

     

    *John Thomas, “What’s Good About Feeling Bad: Developing a Theology of Suffering, Saturday, September 19, 8:45 to 10:00 AM, Session 603.

     

    *Rick Marrs, “Making Christian Counseling More Christ-Centered,” Saturday, September 19, 2:15-3:30 PM, Session 703.

     

    To register for the AACC World Conference Tracks, go here http://tinyurl.com/l284w6 and then select the Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Foundations tracks when you sign-up.

     

    BCSFN Mixer

     

    Please join us on Friday evening for the BCSFN Mixer. Our time together will include fellowship, connecting, discussing the latest happenings in the BCSFN, and interacting about ways our division can better equip our members. We want to get to know you and benefit from your participation!

     

    Register for the AACC World Conference

     

    Please visit the following link to register for the 2009 AACC World Conference:

    http://www.aacc.net/conferences/2009-world-conference/