• The Trinity as Our Counseling Foundation

    Posted on September 20th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    AACC Grace and Truth World Conference:

    Day Four and Wrap Up Reflections—The Trinity

     

    Each AACC Conference I attend, I listen for the “underlying” theme—not necessarily the planned theme (this year, Grace and Truth), as powerful as that is. But any consistent threads in plenary sessions, worship, track presentations, personal interactions—that might suggest the Spirit’s underlying theme.

     

    Here’s what I heard: The Trinity.

     

    What sets Christianity apart from everything else? The Trinity.

     

    What sets Christian counseling apart from every other form of people helping? The Trinity.

     

    I listened to the message of Trinitarian theology and Trinitarian counseling from Piper, Crabb, Dave Jenkins, and many others.

     

    Christian counseling/biblical counseling will be filled with grace and truth, will be filled with Scripture and soul, will be filled with truth and love… to the extent that our theology and our personal lives are impacted by and infiltrated by the Trinity.

     

    As I said in my track presentation (http://bit.ly/3ShzlR), “Too often biblical counselors counsel more like Allah than like the Trinity.”

     

    What in the world did I mean by that?

     

    Allah is the alone with the alone.

     

    Aloof.

     

    Distant.

     

    Other than.

     

    Our Trinitarian God is the eternal community.

     

    When we counsel soullessly, when we counsel aloofly, when we counsel with truth minus love…then we ought not to call what we do biblical Christian counseling.

     

    Grace and Truth are mediated via our Trinitarian God as His life, His love, flow through us to those we counsel as we live the truth in love.

     

    That’s the message I listened to this week.

     

    How about you?

  • AACC Day Three: Scripture and Soul

    Posted on September 18th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    AACC Grace and Truth World Conference:

    Day Three Reflections—Scripture and Soul

     

    Friday at the AACC started early and went late.

     

    In the morning, Ian Jones, a fellow BCSFN co-director, received the Gary Collins award for excellence in Christian counseling. Then Larry Crabb gave the plenary session on how the Trinity impacts our counseling.

     

    Immediately after, I gave my BCSFN track presentation on How to Practice Comprehensive Biblical Counseling: Implementing a Dozen Dreams: http://bit.ly/3ShzlR

     

    Had lunch with my Baker Books editor from Beyond the Suffering, Vicki Crumpton. She was a great editor and is a wonderful encourager and friend.

     

    Enjoyed a great time of mutual encouragement, sharing, brainstorming, and connecting during the BCSFN Mixer.

     

    Topped things off with the evening the Dinner Theatre.

     

    That’s the “stuff.”

     

    Here’s the inside story.

     

    People are hungry for truly biblical counseling. They are tired of biblical counseling that is half biblical—giving Scripture but not soul; giving truth without love. But they are also tired of counseling that claims to be Christian but follows more of the world than the Word. People long for Scripture and soul. They long for biblical Christian counseling that follows the Apostle Paul’s model in 1 Thessalonians 2:8. “We loved you so much that we were delighted to give you not only the Scriptures but our own souls, because you were so dear to us.”

     

    Bob

     

  • Community

    Posted on September 18th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    AACC Grace and Truth World Conference: Day Two Reflections–Community

     

    Here’s a recap of Thursday at the AACC World Conference.

     

    Conferences like these are never only about the content, as important as that is.

     

    They are also about community.

     

    I was able to connect with many students and co-workers from Capital Bible Seminary’s MACCD (MA in Christian Counseling and Discipleship) department. Had a great time reconnecting with Professor Chris Boucher and his whole family. Also spent some wonderful time with Terri Polm who was our full-time mentor of women and with Jim Nestle who was our full-time mentor of men. Met up with Pastor Harry Pilson and Sister Olivia Pilson—Olivia is one of our women mentors.

     

    Many of our student graduates/alums stopped by at the Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Formation Network (BCSFN) booth. It’s always so encouraging to hear how God is using people to impact others.

     

    Sister Ellen Barney and I talked for a long time. Sister Ellen was in the first two years of our program and has always been such an encourager. She also has trained lay women every year in LEAD: Lay Encouragers And Disciplers. Their church uses both Soul Physicians and Spiritual Friends to equip their women for one another ministry.

     

    The World Conference is also always a great opportunity to reconnect with men and women from around the country and the world who also are equipping others. Had a great time at lunch with Dr. Ian Jones from Southwestern Seminary, a great time at dinner with Dr. Steve Greggo from Trinity. Spent time during the day with my good friend Dr. Eric Johnson from Southern Seminary, with Dr. Phil Monroe from Biblical Seminary, Dr. Miriam Parent from Trinity, Dr. Ron Hawkins from Liberty, and so many others.

     

    Today, I will be off soon to hear Dr. Larry Crabb present a plenary message on the impact of Trinitarian theology on biblical counseling. It will be a special privilege to close that plenary session in prayer, since I studied under Larry at Grace Seminary. His personal mentoring, friendship, teaching, and writings have impacted me in many ways.

     

    Then I’ll race off (lots of racing here!) to present my track session on How to Practice Comprehensive Biblical Counseling: Implementing a Dozen Dreams. We’ll be looking together at ways to ensure that our counseling is Christ-centered, comprehensive, compassionate, and culturally-informed.

     

    A full day will follow after that. Lord willing, I will share about it on Saturday morning. Thanks for following the journey.

     

    Bob

  • Grace and Truth

    Posted on September 14th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

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    The American Association of Christian Counselors’ World Conference
    Grace and Truth

    I’ll be leaving Tuesday morning for and returning Sunday afternoon from the AACC’s 2009 Grace and Truth World Conference.

    Every other year the AACC hosts 5,000-t0-7,000 pastors, lay people, educators, psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, missionaries, spiritual directors, and spiritual friends.

    Great worship, plenary speakers, several hundred ministry “booths,” 40 pre-conference presentations, and scores of track presentations combine with connecting to make this a premier event.

    I’ll be presenting a Pre-Con Wednesday (9-Noon) on Developing a Biblical Methodology of Biblical Counseling.

    Then Friday morning I’ll lead a Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Formation Network (BCSFN) Track on How to Practice Comprehensive Biblical Counseling. There are six other great BCSFN Track presentations throughout the week.

    Friday night I’ll faciliate, along with Dr. Ian Jones and Dr. Ron Hawkins, the BCSFN Mixer: sharing our vision for biblical counseling and spiritual formation, hearing from among our over 5,000 BCSFN members how we can further equip them, and dreaming together.

    I’d love to meet any of you in person. If you’re attending, be sure to look me up.

    I’ll also try to Twitter and Facebook along the way to keep you posted.

    For more info: http://www.aacc.net/

    The big event is in Nashville at the Grand Ole Opry–it’s like a city all unto itself. Massive.

    In Christ’s Grace,

    Bob

  • African American Women of Faith, Part 3

    Posted on September 12th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    A Voice for the Voiceless: African American Women of Faith

    Part 3: Octavia Rogers Albert: Weeping with Those Who Weep

     

    Note: Taken from Sacred Friendships: Celebrating the Legacy of Women Heroes of the Faith. For more information on this book, please visit: http://bit.ly/YmaM1

     

    Note: For part one of this blog mini-series, please visit: http://bit.ly/T7Zas  and for part two, please visit: http://bit.ly/14aWH6

     

    Weeping with Those Who Weep

     

    Listening without feeling is rather worthless. Octavia Albert combines both as she ministers to Charlotte Brooks.

     

    “Poor Charlotte Brooks! I can never forget how her eyes were filled with tears when she would speak of all her children: ‘Gone, and no one to care for me!’”

     

    Octavia then weeps with Charlotte as she weeps.

     

    “I must say that she caused tears to flow from my eyes many a day while relating her hardships.”

     

    Octavia teaches us that it is not enough to listen (as foundational as that is); it is not enough to feel for another; we also must communicate our compassion.

     

    Octavia does so not only via her shed tears, but also through her expressed commiseration.

     

    “Aunt Charlotte, my heart throbs with sympathy, and my eyes are filled with tears, whenever I hear you tell of the trials of yourself and others. I’ve read and heard very often of the hard punishments of the slaves in the South; but the half was never told.”

     

    Charlotte’s response indicates that Octavia has heard her accurately.

     

    “No, half of it aint been told. I could sit right here and tell you the trials and tribulations I have had to go through with my three marsters here in Louisiana, and it would be dark before I got half through with my own; but if I tried to tell of the sorrows of others, what I have seen here in Louisiana since I have been here, it would take me all the week, I reckon.”

     

    Imagine Aunt Charlotte not thinking that anyone would ever want to listen, but Jesus. Thinking no one would ever care, no one would ever record her words, much less hear them. Then having this college-educated pastor’s wife weeping with her. Identifying with her.

     

    The Rest of the Story

     

    For the rest of the story, please return to this blog for part four . . .

     

    Note: Readers can enjoy the empowering narratives of over two-dozen African American women (and scores of African American men) narrated in Kellemen and Edwards, Beyond the Suffering. For more information, please visit: http://bit.ly/XvsTu

  • Throbbing with Sympathy

    Posted on September 9th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    A Voice for the Voiceless: African American Women of Faith

    Part 2: Octavia Rogers Albert: Throbbing with Sympathy

     

    Note: Taken from Sacred Friendships: Celebrating the Legacy of Women Heroes of the Faith. For more information on this book, please visit: http://bit.ly/YmaM1

     

    Note: For part one of this blog mini-series, please visit: http://bit.ly/T7Zas

     

    An Ear to Hear; a Mouthpiece to Speak

     

    According to historian John Blassingame, Octavia Albert was one of the few well-trained and one of the most interesting interviewers in the country during the Reconstruction era. She combined academic excellence with sympathetic brilliance. That combination, important to researchers today, was vitally meaningful to the ex-slaves who shared their stories with her.

     

    As the educated “First Lady” (pastor’s wife) of an African American church, she represented to them a figure of compassion, accomplishment, and status. So it is no surprise that when she moved to Louisiana her home became a gathering place for former slaves.

     

    “There she offered them food, read them scriptures, taught them to read and write, and encouraged them to talk about themselves and their slave experiences.”

     

    None But Jesus!

     

    Her decision to offer them a listening ear and to be their mouthpiece surprised even her interviewees. Among those Octavia ministered to, Charlotte Brooks was preeminent. Octavia tells Charlotte that she has greatly enjoyed their conversations, has listened to every word of her “past unhappy life” in the cane fields of Louisiana, and that “I desire to write it in your own words.” 

     

    Charlotte bluntly expresses her shock that any human would identify with her.

     

    “La, me, child! I never thought any body would care enough for me to tell of my trials and sorrows in this world! None but Jesus knows what I have passed through.”

     

    And not just anyone—but the “First Lady” valued “Aunt Charlotte” by dispensing the sustaining grace of listening to her story of suffering. As “Jesus with skin on her,” Octavia’s ministry was life changing.

     

    Listening to Her Sad Story

     

    Octavia records her own perceptions of her soul care of Charlotte.

     

    “It was in the fall of 1879 that I met Charlotte Brooks. She was brought from the State of Virginia and sold in the State of Louisiana many years before the war. I have spent hours with her listening to her telling of her sad life of bondage in the cane-fields of Louisiana.”

     

    If one picture is worth 1,000 words, then this one example is worth 1,000 pages of training in sustaining. Spend hours listening to people tell their sad story of suffering. Our quick-fix, solution-focused, speak-first culture desperately needs to develop the relational competency of sustained listening.

     

    The Rest of the Story

     

    For the rest of the story, please return to this blog for part three . . .

     

    Note: Readers can enjoy the empowering narratives of over two-dozen African American women (and scores of African American men) narrated in Kellemen and Edwards, Beyond the Suffering. For more information, please visit: http://bit.ly/XvsTu

  • Who Will Tell the African American Story?

    Posted on September 7th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    A Voice for the Voiceless: African American Women of Faith

    Part 1: Octavia Rogers Albert: Who Will Tell Our Story?

     

    Note: Taken from Sacred Friendships: Celebrating the Legacy of Women Heroes of the Faith. For more information on this book, please visit: http://bit.ly/YmaM1

     

    Octavia Rogers Albert: Who Will Tell Our Story?

     

    She lived a mere thirty-seven years, yet in The House of Bondage Octavia Rogers Albert (1853-1890) chronicles two-hundred-fifty years of African American history. Like no one before her or since, male or female, she provides a voice for voiceless ex-enslaved African Americans.

     

    Her writing offers the immediacy of first-person accounts mediated by her sensitive interviews and empathetic conversations. She recognizes the insufficiency of secondary sources.

     

    “None but those who resided in the South during the time of slavery can realize the terrible punishments that were visited upon the slaves. . . . The half was never told concerning this race that was in bondage nearly two hundred and fifty years.”

     

    Her Lifelong Mission

     

    Octavia’s lifelong mission was to unpack the personal narratives of those whose “home” was the “house of bondage.” When Colonel Douglass Wilson derides himself for telling his experiences of enslavement and of military service in the Civil War, Octavia insists that he testify.

     

    “I believe we should not only treasure these things, but should transmit them to our children’s children. That’s what the Lord commanded Israel to do in reference to their deliverance from Egyptian bondage, and I verily believe that the same is his will concerning us and our bondage and deliverance in this country.”

     

    Her resolve is steely. She writes to give God glory by giving African Americans a voice to answer the question, “Who shall return to tell Egypt the story?”

     

    The hymn (Sound the Loud Timbrel O’er Egypt’s Dark Sea) that concludes her narrative of former slaves “summarizes her theme that abolition was the triumph of God’s will over evil and that those who have been delivered must return to tell the story.”

     

    Firsthand Experience

     

    Octavia does not write as an aloof observer. Born on December 24, 1853, in Oglethorpe, Georgia, of slave parentage, she faced firsthand the horrors and humiliation of enslavement. While still living in Oglethorpe she joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was led by the legendary Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, whose ministry grounded her in her lifelong Christian faith.

     

    After Emancipation, she studied at Atlanta University. Her first teaching job was in Montezuma, Georgia, where, on October 21, 1874, at age twenty-one, she married another teacher at the school, the Rev. A. E. P. Albert, D.D., who later became an ordained minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church.

     

    Soon after their marriage, the Alberts moved to Houma, Louisiana, where Octavia began conducting her interviews with men and women once enslaved. She apparently suffered an untimely death, the circumstances of which are unknown. The preface to her book, authored by her husband and their only child, Laura, implies that she died in 1890.

     

    The Rest of the Story

     

    For the rest of the story, please return to this blog for part two . . .

     

    Note: Readers can enjoy the empowering narratives of over two-dozen African American women (and scores of African American men) narrated in Kellemen and Edwards, Beyond the Suffering. For more information, please visit: http://bit.ly/XvsTu

     

  • The 20 Most Influential Books on Methods of Biblical Change

    Posted on September 6th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    Kellemen’s Christian The Best Of Guide

    The Best of Books on

    Methods of Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Formation

     

    Kellemen’s Christian The Best of Guide: Making your life easier by finding, summarizing, evaluating, and posting the best resources on a wide variety of topics from a Christian perspective.

     

    The Twenty Most Influential Books on

    Methods of Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Formation

     

    Note: The following books focus on the methodology, practice, skills, relational competencies of biblical counseling and spiritual formation. They do not highlight theology/theory (see last week’s post for that: http://bit.ly/T75vO) (if it made last week’s list, it is not in this week’s list). The books on this week’s list focus broadly on methods of helping people to grow in Christ. They do not highlight how to help people with specific “issues” in living (such as depression treatment, anxiety treatment, etc.).

     

    Note: For the sake of space, I have not reviewed each of these books. However, I do have a 55-page document that reviews over 125 books on Biblical Counseling and Spiritual Formation: http://bit.ly/sYx1U.

     

    Note: The fuller document explains that I do not endorse everything in all the books below. That’s why my subtitle to this post is: “The Twenty Most Influential” rather than “The Best Of.”

     

    Bibliography

     

    Adams, Jay E. The Christian Counselor’s Manual: The Practice of Nouthetic Counseling. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1973.

     

    Adams, Jay E. Competent to Counsel: An Introduction to Nouthetic Counseling. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1970.

     

    Clebsch, William A. and Charles R. Jaekle. Pastoral Care in Historical Perspective. New edition. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1994.

     

    Clinton, Tim, Archibald D. Hart, George Ohlschlager, eds. Caring for People God’s Way: Personal and Emotional Issues, Addictions, Grief, and Trauma. Nashville: Nelson, 2006.

     

    Collins, Gary. The Biblical Basis of Christian Counseling for People Helpers: Relating the Basic Teachings of Scripture to People’s Problems. Colorado Springs: NavPress, 1993.

     

    Crabb, Larry. Soul Talk. Nashville: Integrity, 2005.

     

    Crabb, Larry and Dan Allender. Encouragement: The Key to Caring. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1984.

     

    Fitzpatrick, Elyse, and Dennis Johnson. Counsel from the Cross: Connecting Broken People to the Love of Christ. Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2009.

     

    Foster, Richard. Celebration of Discipline: The Path to Spiritual Growth. Twenty-fifth anniversary edition. San Francisco, Harper, 2003.

     

    Huggins, Kevin. Friendship Counseling. Colorado Springs: NavPress, 2003.

     

    Kellemen, Robert W. Spiritual Friends: A Methodology of Soul Care and Spiritual Direction. Revised Edition. Winona Lake, IN: BMH Books, 2007.

     

    MacArthur, John F., Jr. and Wayne A. Mack. Counseling: How to Counsel Biblically. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2005.

     

    Moon, Gary W. and David G. Benner, eds. Spiritual Direction and the Care of Souls: A Guide to Christian Approaches and Practices. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity. 2004.

     

    Ortberg, John. The Life You’ve Always Wanted. Expanded Edition. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2002.

     

    Peugh, Roger and Tammy Schultz. Transformed in His Presence: The Need for Prayer in Counseling. Winona Lake, IN: BMH Books, 2005.

     

    Powlison, David. Speaking Truth in Love: Counsel in Community. Phillipsburg, NJ: P & R, 2005.

     

    Welch, Edward T. When People Are Big and God Is Small: Overcoming Peer Pressure, Codependency, and the Fear of Man. Phillipsburg, NJ: P & R, 1997.

     

    Whitney, Donald. Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life. Colorado Springs: NavPress, 1991.

     

    Willard, Dallas. The Divine Conspiracy: Rediscovering Our Hidden Life in God. San Francisco: Harper, 1998.

     

    Willard, Dallas. The Spirit of the Disciplines: Understanding How God Changes Lives. Reprint edition. San Francisco: Harper, 1991.

     

    Important Stuff

     

    *Your Guide: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., LCPC, is the Founder and CEO of RPM Ministries (www.rpmministries.org) through which he writes, speaks, and consults to equip God’s people to change lives with Christ’s changeless truth. He blogs daily at http://rpmministries.blogspot.com.

     

    *My Necessary Disclaimer: Of course, I don’t endorse everything in every article, book, or link that you’ll find in Kellemen’s Christian The Best of Guide. I report, you decide.

     

    *Your Suggestions Are Welcomed: Feel free to post comments and/or send emails (rpm.ministries@gmail.com) about resources that you think deserve attention in various categories covered in Kellemen’s Christian The Best of Guide.

  • Nourish the Hunger of the Soul

    Posted on September 4th, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    How to Care Like Christ

    Part IV: Nourish the Hunger of the Soul

     

    Blog Series Note: How to Care Like Christ equips lay people, pastors, and professional Christian counselors with the biblical knowledge and relational skills to change lives with Christ’s changeless truth.

     

    Preventative Medicine—God’s Word (Matthew 4:4)

     

    Doctoring the body does not begin with the treatment of illness, but with preventive maintenance of health. Knowing how to keep the body healthy requires that we understand what the body needs. What diet? What nutrients?

        

    So it is with doctoring the soul. What does the soul need? What nutrients? Jesus reminds us in Matthew 4:4 that we do not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God. Our souls need the Bread of Life, the Word of Life. What are the implications of this for biblical counseling?

     

    Feast on the Word of God: Coram Deo Sola Scriptura—Colossians 2:3-10; 2 Peter 1:3

     

    We nourish the Word-hunger of our soul by feasting on the Word of God. Martin Luther called this living coram Deo sola scriptura: face-to-face with God by Scripture alone. Deo is Latin for God; coram is Latin for in the presence of, face-to-face with, sola means alone, and Scriptura is Scripture. Luther used this phrase to illustrate that we live and breathe with reference to God every second in every situation. Luther perceived all of life as a story of personal encounter with God, that the deepest questions in the human soul are God questions, and that we find our deepest answers in God’s Word.

     

    Paul sends the same message when he insists that in Christ are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. Therefore, we must not let anyone take us captive through worldly philosophy which depends on human reason instead of upon Christ (Colossians 2:3-10). Peter echoes Paul when he reminds us that in Christ we have all things that pertain unto life and godliness (2 Peter 1:3). The Word of God is profound—it deeply addresses the real life issues of real people in a really messy world! That’s why biblical counselors join their spiritual friends in feasting on God’s Word for daily existence.

     

    Make Truth and Love Kiss: Philippians 1:9-10; Ephesians 4:15; 1 Thessalonians 2:8

     

    As we minister God’s Word to people’s suffering and sin, we must make truth and love kiss. We need to make Philippians 1:9-10 our spiritual friendship prayer. “And this is my prayer: that your love may abound more and more in knowledge and depth of insight, so that you may be able to discern what is best.”

     

    Love is not enough. Truth is not enough. Love and truth must kiss. When our love abounds in depth of insight, we are able to discern what is best for our lives and for the lives of our spiritual friends.

     

    Paul is excited. It is as if he says, “I’m praying that your love very much exceedingly spills over!” The word he uses for “abound” relates to the word used for the abundance remaining after Christ fed the 5,000. It speaks of liberality, lavishness, overabundance, and spoiling. Don’t you want to spoil others with Christ’s love?

     

    You can if you do it in full knowledge and depth of insight. “Full knowledge” pictures noticing attentively, discerning, fully perceiving, observing, and discovering. That’s what God calls soul physicians to do: diligently dig to uncover the buried treasure of truth contained in God’s Word.

     

    “Depth of insight” suggests the experiential use of wisdom—knowledge applied to life. Don’t you long to share Christ’s changeless truth to change people’s lives?

     

    The Rest of the Story

     

    *Return tomorrow when we explore how to nourish the spiritual hunger of the soul.

     

    *For the full story, feel free to visit: http://bit.ly/7vaE

  • Seven Topics Every Biblical Counselor Must Master

    Posted on September 3rd, 2009 bob.kellemen No comments

    How to Care Like Christ

    Part III: The Soul Physician’s Desk Reference (SPDR) Manual

     

    Blog Series Note: How to Care Like Christ seeks to equip lay people, pastors, and professional Christian counselors with the biblical knowledge and relational skills to change lives with Christ’s changeless truth.

     

    Two books are standard in any physician’s office: The Physician’s Desk Reference (PDR) and The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy (Merck). Both are considered “Bibles of medical knowledge and practice.”

     

    With its 3,223 pages of prescription drugs, the annually updated PDR is the most comprehensive, widely used drug reference available. It details the usage, warnings, and precautions for more than 4,000 prescription drugs.

     

    Merck is the most widely used medical text in the world. It provides the latest information on the vast expanse of human diseases, disorders, and injuries, as well as their symptoms and treatments. Intended for physicians, it is still useful for the layperson. As one sage has commented, “It is a must for everyone in a human body.”

     

    If the PDR and Merck are the Old Testament and New Testament for physicians treating the body, then the Bible is God’s final, authoritative word for physicians treating the soul. It is the Soul Physician’s Desk Reference (SPDR) manual for dispensing grace. It’s “a must for anyone who is a soul.” God’s Word provides not only the latest, but also the eternal, enduring information on the soul’s design and disease, as well as its care and cure.

     

    What do we discover as we read the pages of the Soul Physician’s Desk Reference (SPDR)? We learn what makes biblical counseling biblical. We learn our Great Physician’s authoritative truth about how to:

     

    1. Nourish the Hunger of the Soul: Preventive Medicine—God’s Word

    2. Know the Creator of the Soul: The Great Physician—The Trinity

    3. Examine the Spiritual Anatomy of the Soul: People—Creation

    4. Diagnose the Fallen Condition of the Soul: Problems—Fall

    5. Prescribe God’s Cure for the Soul: Solutions—Redemption

    6. Envision the Final Healing of the Soul: Home—Glorification

    7. Dispense God’s Care for the Soul: Spiritual Friends—Sanctification

     

    These seven biblical categories are essential for seeing the life of the soul through the lens of Scripture. We will examine them meticulously, as a med-school student examines the skeletal structure of the human body.

     

    The Rest of the Story

     

    *Return tomorrow when we explore how to nourish the spiritual hunger of the soul.

     

    *For the full story, feel free to visit: http://bit.ly/7vaE